Category Climate Change Adaptation

Ground water quality issues- Needs bottom up approach?

 The groundwater pollution is  a serious concern worldwide. The geogenic (natural phenomena) and anthropogenic pressures are major reasons for groundwater pollution. However, in  arid and semi-arid regions, pollution is mainly aggravated due to anthropogenic activities. It can be further exacerbated in future due to climate change and it’s variability.

 The proper monitoring and treatment of contaminants for groundwater  are absolute necessary to avoid risks to health, agriculture productivity and environmental degradation. It also calls for giving high priority to its protection and enhancement in the wake of future climate externalities. This blog post highlights the approach that WOTR has undertaken to bridge the gaps in existing water quality monitoring, assessment programmes and its communication with local stakeholders in India. It provides insights from the current study on preparation of groundwater quality index in Upper Godavari River basin, Ahmednagar.

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Participatory vulnerability assessment

In the month of April 2017, our team visited Padmavati village in Bhokardan block of Jalna district, Maharashtra to carry out a community driven vulnerability assessment study.

Different stakeholders from the village were invited to participate in focus group discussions to share the major changes that had been observed over the years.

Community Driven Vulnerability Evaluation-Program designer : An Introduction

WOTR developed a tool called Community Driven Vulnerability Evaluation-Programme Designer (CoDriVE-PD) that clearly identifies the need to factor in an evaluation of all such key vulnerabilities at an early stage in the project design and subsequently integrate these variables within the project framework, so as to minimize adverse impacts and thus, have better control of the project and the achievement of desired outcomes.

Field musings on the rise of farm ponds and its impact on the common pool groundwater resource.

Farm ponds are being set up to provide protective irrigation so as to secure a second crop and provide water during lean summer months. In Maharashtra, the government has announced schemes to drought proof their land and encourage farmers to construct farm ponds. But is the rise of these structures  in the semi-arid regions of Maharashtra creating inequity in the share of groundwater among farm groups? The following blog post , written by our researcher for the Adaptation in Scale in Semi Arid Regions (ASSAR)  blog highlights the urgent need to rethink on the collective  use of the invisible common pool resource for preventing drought in the long run.

Reclaiming degraded lands and building resilience to climate change in drylands

-Dr Marcella D’souza and Karan Misquitta The UNCCD book-Living Land is a collection of inspiring stories tackling the challenges of land degradation and climate change, and doing so affordably across the globe. These stories explain how land degradation occurs and what we can do, and what is already being done for sustainable land management. The WOTR […]

Improving Soil Health for Enhancing Food and Nutritional Security

WOTR conducted a study to understand the current status of land degradation, its causes, farm management practices employed by people and the perceived impacts of the varying climatic conditions. The study was conducted in 21 villages spread across three districts in Maharashtra- Ahmednagar, Dhule and Jalna. Ten percent farmer households from these villages were interviewed.

Under the blazing sun

The short film “Under the Blazing Sun” was shot during the summers of 2016 and 2017 in two semi- arid districts of Maharashtra in India. The film attempts to explore the problem of heat stress experienced by rural communities. While urban population is better equipped to tackle the heat problem, is that the case with the rural population? If yes how? If not then, what are their problems?

Can Agriculture be more Climate Friendly? Measuring the impact of sustainable agricultural practices on greenhouse gas emissions

By WOTR’s Agriculture Team According to the Gaia theory, earth’s physical and biological processes are linked to form a self-regulating and self-aware system. The regulating processes are often slow and continue over decades or even centuries. With the increasing human interventions; appropriation of most of the natural resources in a hasty manner to fulfill the need […]

Deteriorating Groundwater – Is this an irrevocable process?

Our perceptions and plans to address issues revolving around our water resources need to adapt if we are to respond effectively to the challenge of climate change. Most of our surface water bodies and aquifers are stressed not just in terms of availability of water but also at the quality front. The reasons can be attributed to changes in the timing, form and intensity of precipitation; changes in agricultural practices, urbanisation, industrial pollution and the use of surface and groundwater . It has the potential to have a long lasting impact on various ecosystems and their services that we are completely dependent on. The impacts are likely to affect the ongoing and future programs designed to protect water quality, public health, safety and livelihood of people. With this in mind, WOTR’s Groundwater and Ecology team continued to explore villages in their second leg of Mula-Pravara sub-basinal seasonal study to assess the reasons for the declining water quality.

Adaptation to climate change: What has social structure got to do with it?

While some may doubt and even deny the existence of climate change, rural households in three villages of Aurangabad District in Maharashtra State, India will tell you it is a reality and a daily battle. Climate change also doesn’t act alone – it has two other accomplices – non-climatic risks and coping strategies. In India these accomplices are shaped by historic and structural factors such as caste, gender, local politics and so on, which determine adaptation or maladaptation. In this blog we look at what different caste groups are doing in response to climate change and what has driven them to adopt these practices.