Category Climate Change Adaptation

Reclaiming degraded lands and building resilience to climate change in drylands

-Dr Marcella D’souza and Karan Misquitta The UNCCD book-Living Land is a collection of inspiring stories tackling the challenges of land degradation and climate change, and doing so affordably across the globe. These stories explain how land degradation occurs and what we can do, and what is already being done for sustainable land management. The WOTR […]

Improving Soil Health for Enhancing Food and Nutritional Security

WOTR conducted a study to understand the current status of land degradation, its causes, farm management practices employed by people and the perceived impacts of the varying climatic conditions. The study was conducted in 21 villages spread across three districts in Maharashtra- Ahmednagar, Dhule and Jalna. Ten percent farmer households from these villages were interviewed.

Under the blazing sun

The short film “Under the Blazing Sun” was shot during the summers of 2016 and 2017 in two semi- arid districts of Maharashtra in India. The film attempts to explore the problem of heat stress experienced by rural communities. While urban population is better equipped to tackle the heat problem, is that the case with the rural population? If yes how? If not then, what are their problems?

Can Agriculture be more Climate Friendly? Measuring the impact of sustainable agricultural practices on greenhouse gas emissions

By WOTR’s Agriculture Team According to the Gaia theory, earth’s physical and biological processes are linked to form a self-regulating and self-aware system. The regulating processes are often slow and continue over decades or even centuries. With the increasing human interventions; appropriation of most of the natural resources in a hasty manner to fulfill the need […]

Deteriorating Groundwater – Is this an irrevocable process?

Our perceptions and plans to address issues revolving around our water resources need to adapt if we are to respond effectively to the challenge of climate change. Most of our surface water bodies and aquifers are stressed not just in terms of availability of water but also at the quality front. The reasons can be attributed to changes in the timing, form and intensity of precipitation; changes in agricultural practices, urbanisation, industrial pollution and the use of surface and groundwater . It has the potential to have a long lasting impact on various ecosystems and their services that we are completely dependent on. The impacts are likely to affect the ongoing and future programs designed to protect water quality, public health, safety and livelihood of people. With this in mind, WOTR’s Groundwater and Ecology team continued to explore villages in their second leg of Mula-Pravara sub-basinal seasonal study to assess the reasons for the declining water quality.

Adaptation to climate change: What has social structure got to do with it?

While some may doubt and even deny the existence of climate change, rural households in three villages of Aurangabad District in Maharashtra State, India will tell you it is a reality and a daily battle. Climate change also doesn’t act alone – it has two other accomplices – non-climatic risks and coping strategies. In India these accomplices are shaped by historic and structural factors such as caste, gender, local politics and so on, which determine adaptation or maladaptation. In this blog we look at what different caste groups are doing in response to climate change and what has driven them to adopt these practices.

A nudge in the right direction: Using agro-advisories to encourage sustainable agriculture

Mobile telecommunications are increasingly being used to deliver weather forecasts directly to farmers in the form of regular advisories. These advisories are also used to introduce farmers to sustainable and innovative agricultural practices that can contribute to improving yields and reducing costs. In this blog we turn to insights from behavioural research to understand how and why advisories can be used to encourage the adoption of sustainable agricultural practices and the implications of this for scaling up these services

Natural Springs in the Western Ghats – a vital natural resource, but completely neglected

In the Western Ghats, natural springs are a source of drinking water for many vulnerable rural communities. The springs serve as an essential component for the functioning of our forest cover and dependent ecosystem, yet their conservation is a completely neglected affair. Neither the Maharashtra state policy nor our national policy framework for natural resource management address this issue. There is an urgent need for a paradigm shift from source exploitation to resources management, especially in lieu of climate change. In this post we take a look at springs located in the hilly regions of Akole and Sangamner in Ahmdednagar district. Spring sources that we have surveyed are on a declining trend (both in terms of numbers and discharge), wherein some of the perennial springs have dried up or have been encroached upon, contaminated or destroyed – making it a serious issue for water resource management.