Category Field Notes

Participatory vulnerability assessment

In the month of April 2017, our team visited Padmavati village in Bhokardan block of Jalna district, Maharashtra to carry out a community driven vulnerability assessment study.

Different stakeholders from the village were invited to participate in focus group discussions to share the major changes that had been observed over the years.

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To the field : A dichotomous world

The initial few days at any organisation are all about getting to know it better. One tends to read about the organisation’s journey, its work, achievements and failures. While we were busy doing the same at WOTR, there was something atypical everyone kept talking about “the field”. Some said, “At WOTR, you will get a lot of field exposure”, or “Ah! Field is always good!” It almost seemed like there was dichotomy in the world here- the desk in the predominantly cream coloured office and the Field.

Jal Hi Jeevan Hai

On 22nd March, on the occasion of  World Water Day,  National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development. (NABARD) in collaboration with Centre for Environment Education (CEE) and other local organisations  launched Jalme Jeevanam (Water is Life) campaign in around 1,00,000 villages across 200 districts to create awareness about conservation and preservation of water resources.

VIBRANT PALETTE OF RAJASTHAN

In the month of March we traveled to Badoondiya and Modwa villages in Udaipur district, Rajasthan in order to film the intervention activities implemented by WOTR. These villages are located on the hills and are majorly inhabited by the tribals. This photo story is an attempt to showcase the candid moments that display the vivid colours of Rajasthan.

 

Can Agriculture be more Climate Friendly? Measuring the impact of sustainable agricultural practices on greenhouse gas emissions

By WOTR’s Agriculture Team According to the Gaia theory, earth’s physical and biological processes are linked to form a self-regulating and self-aware system. The regulating processes are often slow and continue over decades or even centuries. With the increasing human interventions; appropriation of most of the natural resources in a hasty manner to fulfill the need […]

Dhavalpuri Bazaar

In Rural India, bazaars are still a grand weekly event, where makeshift stalls appear on the roadside for the day. It is an amalgamation of culture, emotions and colours. Apart from selling a variety of products ranging from vegetables to clothes, from livestock to sweetmeats, these are places where people meet, catch up, and network with each other.
This photo essay showcases some glimpses captured from our visit to the weekly bazaar at Dhavalpuri.

Enterprising agriculturalist 2: Entrepreneurship and Employment in a village in Western Maharashtra

In Maharashtra, agriculture serves as a major source of rural livelihood. This sector is most vulnerable to climate change, as it is highly dependent on weather, and the vagaries of the climate. Given this uncertainty people are continually modifying their agricultural practices to suit their specific needs, available knowledge and resources. In this blog, following our earlier blog on pomegranate cultivation, we turn to a village in Jalna called Hivre Korda that has diversified its economy in response to changes in aspiration and agrarian distress. We visited this village and conducted group discussions with different landholding farmers like large, medium, small and landless for one of our studies.

GROUNDWATER-A DISTURBING DIP

As many parts of Maharashtra continue to be inundated with rain it is easy to forget that at this time last year much of the state was reeling under drought. While the rains this year will recharge groundwater tables, given current groundwater usage patterns it is unlikely that this water would contribute to help farmers tide over the next. KV Maitreyi looks at the root causes of water scarcity and what the state is doing to overcome it

THE VILLAGES OF THE OLD: A STORY OF SELF-AUGMENTING MIGRATION AND RE-MIGRATION PATTERN

Perched in the remote areas of Koyna backwaters and the buffer zone of Koyna Wildlife Sanctuary are a few villages which have been following a strange pattern of life for sixty years now. Being one of the highest rainfall receiving areas of Maharashtra, water scarcity is not a problem that bothers the farmers here. Yet, a huge number of young people migrate each year to faraway cities for work and livelihood, only to come back in their ripe years to pursue agriculture. This blog post traces the path of this migration right from when it triggered to the present day scenario and reflects on its impacts on the surrounding environment and the local social fabric.

Enterprising Agriculturalists: Insights into agrarian prosperity from women’s perspectives

Located on the bank of the river Mula that flows through the Sangamner taluka, Borban is a small, prosperous village with the population of 600 persons. The majority of the village is engaged in agriculture and more than 95 percent of the farmers in the village belong to the small and marginal landholding category. While Borban has without a doubt benefitted from its rich resource endowment, one must also recognize the role that agricultural entrepreneurship has played. Further taking a gender perspective allows us to peel back the veneer of prosperity and ask whether indeed all is well in Borban?